By CEJISS (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By CEJISS (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

We’ve all been there, You’ve either volunteered (or been volunteered) to work on a project with a team of folks from across the organization, or the boss has had enough of a particular issue and told you all to go “work it out.” The last time you were involved in one of these projects everyone made small talk with each other around the table until crunch time, then it was mayhem.

Often we find ourselves in a position where we have to accomplish a goal with a group of individuals who have been pulled together informally, but we have not been given authority over the people or resources we need to be successful. Or, we may find ourselves as part of a “committee” where no leader has been designated. Despite a lack of clear lines of authority, the boss expects success. Sounds painful, right? Well, it can be, or it can be an excellent opportunity to step up and exercise some informal leadership skills.

Taking on an informal or peer leadership role can be a great way to develop some of the more subtle skills that great leaders have. Your whole approach to leading a team will change when you don’t have “Because I said so” to fall back on.

Intrigued? Tell me more, you say? You’ve decided you’re going to take charge at the next meeting instead of letting everyone stare blankly at each other? Good for you! Here are some things you can do to help your ragtag team be successful.

  • Keep the focus on the end state your team needs to achieve.
  • Find out what interest your teammates have in being on the team. How did they get on the team? Are they representing a functional area? How important is the team’s success to them as individuals?
  • Focus on solutions, not positions or policies.
  • Brainstorm potential solutions. Allow everyone’s voice to be heard.
  • Find a balance between meeting and doing the work. Overly frequent status meetings put the focus on meeting and keeping track of status to the detriment of individuals performing their role.
  • Build trust. I know this is easier said than done, but this is where letting people be heard and focusing on solutions can help. Also, give credit and recognition where it is due.
  • Build consensus and accept compromise.  It may not turn our exactly according to your vision, but if it meets the goal it may be good enough.

So now you’re ready to step up and take charge the next time you see an opportunity! The question is, will you?

How have you approached being an informal or peer leader in the past? What were successful approaches? Any unsuccessful experiences?