It is inevitable that one day our boss will say to us, “I need to you run this project/committee/event/etc. but I need you to do it in addition to all the other things you’re doing and I can’t assign anyone to you to help and the budget is really limited (or non-existent). I know you’ll be able to figure it out!” When I was in the Air Force these things

One of the most frustrating situations that a young leader can face is when they’ve been assigned to complete some kind of project or task but haven’t been officially assigned any people or resources to accomplish it. The assignment usually comes with very little guidance from higher up and some encouraging word to them that “You’ll figure it out!”. While this sounds like a horrible situation to be in, young leaders can

One universal truth that I have found about leaders is that once we have committed ourselves to the study and discipline of leadership, we are always looking for more opportunities to lead and make a difference. We start to develop a talent for seeing ways to improve products, services or experiences in ways that make our customers, co-workers and even our own lives better. We become focused on improving ourselves

I bet you know this story; you’ve probably lived through it. We had pulled together a team from across several departments build a strategic plan for a critical aspect of our whole organization. It was the kind unavoidable committee work that we’ve all had to participate in when the stakes are high and multiple departments are essential to a successful outcome. Adding tension to the discussion is that most of these

One of the most interesting and amusing experiences I had at DEFCON was while we were waiting in line to register and pay our conference fee. If you’re not familiar with DEFCON, there’s no pre-registration or credit card payments accepted so everyone waits in line and pay cash to register for the conference. The line can be long at times, but it’s a great way to meet new people and

We’ve all been there, You’ve either volunteered (or been volunteered) to work on a project with a team of folks from across the organization, or the boss has had enough of a particular issue and told you all to go “work it out.” The last time you were involved in one of these projects everyone made small talk with each other around the table until crunch time, then it was